Sandra Brown’s “Deadline”

41etgcLJpwL._SL160_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-dp,TopRight,12,-18_SH30_OU01_AA160_[1]I just wrote a short review of Roxana Robinson’s Sparta, a novel about a U.S. soldier’s adjustment to civilian life upon his return from Afghanistan, and now I finished another book related to this topic, Sandra Brown’s Deadline.

A similar topic, different genres. And what a difference it makes! Sparta is a psychological drama the believability of which makes your heart ache, whereas Deadline is an entertaining thriller, with nerve-racking danger and hot romance.

In Deadline, Dawson Scott, an award-winning journalist, comes back from Afghanistan where he covered the current events, focusing on the heroic actions of the American troops. Suffering from PTSD and haunting memories, he wants nothing but a few weeks’ rest.

But rest is denied to Dawson: Gary Headly, an FBI agent and Dawson’s friend, asks him to go to Savannah, Georgia, to cover a murder trial that involves Marine Captain Jeremy Wesson, a decorated war veteran who had done several tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. Agent Headly suspects that this case may be connected to another case, involving domestic terrorists, that he failed to solve almost forty years ago.  For Dawson, it could be a Pulitzer Prize worthy story, which is what he has been after throughout his journalistic career. So he agrees.

Dawson Scott gets much more than he bargained for: There is another murder; there is a dark secret; there is unexpected love; there are shocking revelations;  and there are  menacing threats.

Dawson came from Afghanistan in one piece, if damaged emotionally, but now his life is in danger again, as well as the lives of the people he cares about. It is his courage and his swift actions that can avert the worst outcome.

If you like thrillers with nail-biting suspense, you will like Deadline. Its twists and turns and cliffhangers in every chapter will make you turn pages until you finish it.

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