Tag Archive | fiction

Joel Goldman: On Publishing

I’ve just finished No Way Out by Joel Goldman and I loved it so much that I wanted to check out an interview with the author on YouTube (as I usually do). In the one below, Joel Goldman gives his view on traditional publishing and self-publishing, comparing the two. I find it very useful, because he lists and explains the pros and cons of each route that an author can take, supporting his statements with examples about the publication process, as well as the royalties, from his own publishing experience.

“Self-publishing is a no-brainer if you’re an entrepreneur,” says Joel Goldman.

Now I understand why this internationally acclaimed best-selling crime novelist, with 8 novels published traditionally, has switched to self-publishing.

A great interview! Thank you, Mr. Goldman! 🙂

Nadezhda Seiler’s “A Measure of Guilt”

AMOGHappy New Year, my friends! I hope it will be productive and joyful for everyone.

Today is the second anniversary of the publication of my novel A Measure of Guilt, and since it’s my creation, I treat this date as its birthday. I think it’s only right to start posting on my blog in 2015 with this acknowledgement.

Thus, the New Year’s celebration continues for me. 🙂

Here’s the blurb:

Nineteen-year-old Kate Flanagan has already endured entirely too much in her young life. Two years earlier, her kid sister, Angie, and her best friend, Sandra, were kidnapped from a San Diego amusement park, and Kate’s guilt over the part she played in the tragedy is beyond measure. Believing herself undeserving of a normal life, Kate avoids relationships, feels estranged from her parents, and has no social life. When she begins receiving increasingly chilling anonymous notes on her windshield, she dismisses them as the work of a random stalker.

The fifth note, however, claims that the writer has information about her sister. Hopeful that Angie and Sandra are still alive, distrustful of the police, and frightened by the escalating threat of the notes, Kate nevertheless decides to smoke out the source of the notes. With the help of an amateur private investigator, Kate sets out on a mission to find her sister and best friend— a hunt that leads her straight to her deranged stalker.

In this intriguing mystery tale, a woman anxious to atone for the past mistakes that have cost her nearly everything puts her life on the line in a desperate attempt to right a terrible wrong and catch a determined criminal.

If you read my second novel, Without Thinking Twice, you will be surprised (pleasantly, I hope) to meet again with one of its characters in A Measure of Guilt. And if you read A Measure of Guilt, you may be interested in its sequel that I’m currently working on, which will be released this year.

The novel can be purchased on Abbott Press, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble. The e-book version is available for download for most e-readers, including, but not limited, to Kindle, Nook, iPad and Sony.

Nadezhda Seiler’s “Without Thinking Twice”

ResizeImageHandler[10]Today I devote this post to my own novel, Without Thinking Twice. It’s the second anniversary of its publication and, even if it’s not a bestseller, I think it deserves acknowledgement, just like all the other novels that I review in my blog. Because I put my heart and soul into this book is a good enough reason for me to celebrate this anniversary, don’t you think? 🙂

Here’s the blurb:

Russian brides, Lara and Yulia, are navigating their new lives in the United States. After the initial excitement that surrounds their marriages to their American husbands suddenly wears off, the two women develop a friendship that they both hope can help them survive the clash of personalities, cultures, and expectations that now overshadow their everyday lives.

Lara, a practical woman who hooked up with her husband, Sam, on the Internet, is fairly content with her life in America—until she realizes she needs more from her marriage and life than financial stability. Yulia, a closet poet and a believer in idealistic romance, fell in love at first sight with Bill in Moscow. Unfortunately, unable to distinguish fantasy from reality, Yulia falls prey to an idealized image of her philandering husband who secretly yearns for his bachelorhood. As both women face drastic changes in their destinies, they soon realize that their worries about speaking flawless English are the least of their problems.

In this contemporary romance, two Russian women on a journey to what they once thought would be a fairy tale now must wonder if they will ever attain a happy ending.

Although Without Thinking Twice is not autobiographical, I used some of my personal experiences and observations in it. The novel challenges familiar stereotypes, gender and culture based, telling a story from the point of view of both Russian and American characters, being narrated by four people, two women and two men, whose voices, stories, views and goals distinctly differ from one another.

I was quite happy when Without Thinking Twice was chosen to be included in the Abbott Press 2013 Honorary Catalog.

The novel can be purchased on Abbott Press, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble. The e-book version is available for download for most e-readers, including, but not limited, to Kindle, Nook, iPad and Sony.

Writers on Writing

What a fun little video! Sarah Negovetich, the author of newly-released Rite of Rejection, demonstrates how to write a novel in 90 seconds.

What?! 90 seconds?! Just 90?!

Well, yeah. It’s doable. Sarah did it 🙂 and Rite of Rejection is a fine novel (read my review on this blog or on amazon.com), and now she shows us all the steps.

Looks sooooo eeeeeasy! I’ve never tried to pin flashcards on a board, but I’ll try it with my next novel.

Thanks, Sarah! 🙂

Writers on Writing

I remember what one of my English professors at TWU said about a better time when to start writing fiction–while you’re still young, when your imagination, skills, and energy are at their peak.

Here’s a contradictory opinion. Lee Child, the author of the best-selling Jack Reacher series, believes that “not only can you, but you should start (writing) late, because you’ve lived, you’ve gotten experience…” which young people lack.

Also having started writing late, I can’t agree more with Mr. Child.

Sarah Negovetich’s “Rite of Rejection”

51PgU1YZfUL._UY250_[1]Sarah Negovetich’s Rite of Rejection is a YA novel set in an imaginary society ruled by a leader named “Cardinal” with absolute power. The author masterfully depicts a country with a totalitarian regime (reminiscent of Stalin’s Russia and Hitler’s Germany) where its citizens are so brainwashed that they follow their leader unconsciously, like sheep. Not because they don’t have a mind of their own, but because they’re so enamored by Cardinal’s personality and his ideas that they wholeheartedly trust his “wisdom” and his supposed “devotion” to the well-being of the nation. (Here’s a classic example of the personality cult for you.) When, in an attempt to cleanse the country of criminals, the government designs a machine capable of sorting out the “good” citizens from the “bad” ones and sending the latter to a penal colony for the rest of their lives, no one has any doubt in the faultlessness of the Machine. Even those “rejects” who have never done anything wrong sincerely believe that they might have a propensity for committing a crime, just like the Machine has “predicted.”

That’s how sixteen-year-old Rebecca Collins feels when she, a good girl, is ripped from her family and home and exiled to the PIT, a place of no return. It happens right before the Acceptance ceremony, the biggest event in her life, when she’s about to be welcomed into the society as an adult. After she goes through the Machine (which is just a routine procedure in her mind), she will attend a celebratory ball, where she will dance with eligible bachelors, and, hopefully, with her future husband. (Yes, in this country, a woman’s role is limited to being a wife and mother.)

But Rebecca’s high expectations are crushed when the Machine rejects her. She’s in the PIT now, living in wretched conditions, among “criminals” like herself and actual hardcore criminals. She is confused and scared. How will she survive? Will she survive? Fortunately, she meets other teens who become her friends and who reveal the truth about the Cardinal’s “just” and indisputable policies.

There’s yet another test for Rebecca to go through, this time in order to prove her worthiness and loyalty to her new friends; there’s a love triangle; there’s an attempt to escape; there’s a vital-for-survival friendship and there’s an unfathomable betrayal… And, of course, there’s nail-biting tension all throughout the novel.

Will Rebecca and her friends free themselves of the abject existence in this hellhole? And if they do, where will they go? They can’t go back to their home after all.

Rite of Rejection is so interesting that I read it in one setting. I was disappointed with it ending on a cliffhanger, but I assumed Sarah Negovetich would write a sequel. I do hope that she will.

Favorite line: “There’s freedom that comes with words that don’t fall into perfect measurements or even stitches.”